Tapping a Maple on a Cold Vermont Morning

First came finding the trees. We had tagged them that summer—loops of red twine, tied tightly around craggy trunks—when Fitz had been home, when the chill of winter had seemed distant and unthinkable. The twine would help us find the right maples, he explained—the hard ones, the thick ones, the ones that would yield the sweetest sap—even in the snow. That year, though, the flurries … Continue reading Tapping a Maple on a Cold Vermont Morning

The Gospel of Wealth, (1889) Andrew Carnegie

“Wealth” is an article written by Andrew Carnegie in June of 1889 that describes the responsibility of philanthropy by the new upper class of self-made rich. Carnegie proposed that the best way of dealing with the new phenomenon of wealth inequality was for the wealthy to redistribute their surplus means in a responsible and thoughtful manner. This approach was contrasted with traditional bequest (patrimony), where wealth is handed down to heirs, and … Continue reading The Gospel of Wealth, (1889) Andrew Carnegie

To Charlotte Von Stein, Goethe

Fate, why did you grant us this depth Of insightful vision into our future, So that our love, earthly happiness, Is a thing we can trust in happily never? Why did you grant us such intuition, Such power to know each other’s heart, To see, among life’s scattered throng, The true relationship where we are?  Oh, many thousands of us drift dumbly Through life, our … Continue reading To Charlotte Von Stein, Goethe

Unveiling the Disguise of Trauma in Waltz with Bashir, Justyna Szczupak

Ari Folman and David Polonsky’s animated documentary film, Waltz with Bashir, recounts the experience of the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) men during the First Lebanon War. The focus of the film is the fragmented mind of an IDF veteran who cannot recall any tangible memories about his role in the war, especially the events surrounding the atrocities that took place at the Sabra and Shatila … Continue reading Unveiling the Disguise of Trauma in Waltz with Bashir, Justyna Szczupak

E Unibus Pluram, David Foster Wallace (1990)

Originally published in The Review of Contemporary Fiction, this essay sketches a loose history of the American television industry advertising, U.S. fiction and advertisement. The title “E Unibus Pluram” means “from one, many” and is a solipsistic play on the American motto, “E Pluribus Unum,” which means “out of many, one.” While Wallace acknowledges that TV is fun, most evident from the fact that the average American watches … Continue reading E Unibus Pluram, David Foster Wallace (1990)