Made Of Stone

Your knuckles whiten on the wheel
The last thing that your hands will feel
Your final flight can’t be delayed
No land just sky it’s so serene
Your pink fat lips let go a scream
You fry and melt I love the scene

Sometimes I fantasize
When the streets are cold and lonely
And the cars they burn below me
Don’t these times
Fill your eyes
When the streets are cold and lonely
And the cars they burn below me
Are you all alone?
Is anybody home?

I’m standing warm against the cold
Now that the flames have taken hold
At least you left your life at style

And for as far as I can see
Tin twisted grills grin back at me
Bad money dies I love the scene

Sometimes I fantasize
When the streets are cold and lonely
And the cars they burn below me
Don’t these times
Fill your eyes
When the streets are cold and lonely
And the cars they burn below me
Are you all alone?
Is anybody home?

Sometimes I fantasize
When the streets are cold and lonely
And the cars they burn below me
Don’t these times
Fill your eyes
When the streets are cold and lonely
And the cars they burn below me
Are you all alone?
Are you made of stone?”

The whole album is inspired by the French student riots in 1968: the French flag is on the cover, and the lemons are there because the students used them to help with the effects of tear gas.
This song of all the ones on the album sounds like the most likely to be about a riot. The streets are cold and lonely because they have been cleared by the police, the cars that were set on fire are just left burning.
Obviously the whole song is about the contrast between the fire and the cold, the warmth and the emptiness, being alone and together.
The riots of 1968 were seen as a perfect opportunity for a revolution, but the French communist party failed to act and order was restored – this song is about the cold and loneliness after the riots once order was restored: “sometimes I fantasize” and “don’t these times fill your eyes” (as in tears). The fire could also be a metaphor for his desire, the rioters desire for change and revolution, a desire which was quashed by the cold of the French government.

As with most Stone Roses releases, the cover displays a work by John Squire. It is a Jackson Pollock-influenced piece titled “Bye Bye Badman,” which makes reference to the May 1968 riots in Paris. The cover was named by Q magazine as one of “The 100 Best Covers of All Time.” In the accompanying article, Squire said: “Ian [Brown] had met this French man when he was hitching around Europe, this bloke had been in the riots, and he told Ian how lemons had been used as an antidote to tear gas. Then there was the documentary—-a great shot at the start of a guy throwing stones at the police. I really liked his attitude.” This story was also the inspiration for the lyrics to the song of the same name

6a00d8341d047853ef0133ed171bc4970b-800wi 10.-May-1968-Protests-France 1968_car barricades 563387_10150756556931023_270955416_n Exèrcit_al_Zócalo-28_d'agost NZ parliament 1968 paris68-03s

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s