Philosophy of Humor, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

First published Tue Nov 20, 2012; substantive revision Wed Sep 28, 2016 Although most people value humor, philosophers have said little about it, and what they have said is largely critical. Three traditional theories of laughter and humor are examined, along with the theory that humor evolved from mock-aggressive play in apes. Understanding humor as play helps counter the traditional objections to it and reveals … Continue reading Philosophy of Humor, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Pensees (169) – Blaise Pascal

When I have occasionally set myself to consider the different distractions of men, the pains and perils to which they expose themselves at court or in war, whence arise so many quarrels, passions, bold and often bad ventures, etc., I have discovered that all the unhappiness of men arises from one single fact, that they cannot stay quietly in their own chamber. A man who … Continue reading Pensees (169) – Blaise Pascal

The Decline of the French Intellectual

Originally published in Politico on 19/09/15 and written by Sudhir Hazareesingh.  One of the most characteristic inventions of modern French culture is the “intellectual.” Intellectuals in France are not just experts in their particular fields, such as literature, art, philosophy and history. They also speak in universal terms, and are expected to provide moral guidance about general social and political issues. Indeed, the most eminent French … Continue reading The Decline of the French Intellectual

A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell’s 10 Commandments of Teaching

Perhaps the essence of the Liberal outlook could be summed up in a new decalogue, not intended to replace the old one but only to supplement it. The Ten Commandments that, as a teacher, I should wish to promulgate, might be set forth as follows: Do not feel absolutely certain of anything. Do not think it worth while to proceed by concealing evidence, for the … Continue reading A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell’s 10 Commandments of Teaching

Breaking Free From Constraints, A Lesson I Learned From Two Aficionados

There are inevitably going to be moments in life where you will be repressed, moments when your behaviour will be subject to external control and you will occasionally lack direction of your own life. Whether it’s as a child or as an adult, you will be subject to coercive manipulation one point in your life. I have suffered from this for far too long and … Continue reading Breaking Free From Constraints, A Lesson I Learned From Two Aficionados

Existentialism is a Humanism (1946)

A 1946 philosophical work by Jean-Paul Sartre. It is widely considered one of the defining texts of the Existentialist movement. The book is based on a lecture that Sartre gave at Club Maintenant in Paris, on October 29, 1945, which was also called “Existentialism is a Humanism”. In his essay, Sartre asserts that the key defining concept of existentialism is that the existence of a … Continue reading Existentialism is a Humanism (1946)