All the World’s a Stage, 1599, William Shakespeare

“All the world’s a stage” is the phrase that begins a monologue from William Shakespeare’s As You Like It, spoken by the melancholy Jaques in Act II Scene VII. The speech compares the world to a stage and life to a play, and catalogues the seven stages of a man’s life, sometimes referred to as the seven ages of man: infant, schoolboy, lover, soldier, justice, Pantalone and old age, facing imminent death. All the world’s a stage, And … Continue reading All the World’s a Stage, 1599, William Shakespeare

How To Write With Style by Kurt Vonnegut

From: How to Use the Power of the Printed Word, Doubleday Newspaper reporters and technical writers are trained to reveal almost nothing about themselves in their writings.This makes them freaks in the world of writers,since almost all of the other ink-stained wretches in that world reveal a lot about themselves to readers. We call these revelations, accidental and intentional, elements of style. These revelations tell … Continue reading How To Write With Style by Kurt Vonnegut

Sonnet 18 (1609)

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?  Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:  Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;  And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimm’d; But thy eternal … Continue reading Sonnet 18 (1609)

“Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead! In peace there’s nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility: But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger.” ― William Shakespeare, Henry V

Continue reading “Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead! In peace there’s nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility: But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger.” ― William Shakespeare, Henry V

Infinite Monkey Theoram

The Infinite Monkey Theorem is a proposition that an unlimited number of monkeys, given typewriters and sufficient time, will eventually produce a particular text, such as Hamlet or even the complete works of Shakespeare. The reasoning behind that supposition is that, given infinite time, random input should produce all possible output. The Infinite Monkey Theorem translates to the idea that any problem can be solved, … Continue reading Infinite Monkey Theoram